When you open your first small business, the risks you identify may only be those related to your cash flow, suppliers, competitors, and the industry that you’re in. While they’re all undoubtedly significant risks, there are several others that you probably haven’t considered, and they are faced by many enterprises daily, yours included.

Identifying business risks, along with strategies on mitigating them, should be a part of your business plan. If you’ve missed a certain risk bigger than anything related to your revenue and profit, it could be hard to recover, especially if your business isn’t insured. One way to reduce the damages your business may potentially suffer is by getting protected through the help of a reputable insurance company in Taylorsville, Utah, or in the city where your business resides.

That said, let’s tackle the significant risks you may have overlooked while constructing your business plan.

1. Property Damage Risks

Whether you operate online or in a brick-and-mortar shop, your business faces property damage risks daily, which could be from a fire, natural disaster, or theft.

If you run an e-commerce shop, the area wherein you store your stocks must be well-protected from a fire. There should be a working fire extinguisher and easily accessible exits. Likewise, brick-and-mortar shops need a fire extinguisher that employees know how to use, as well as a fire exit, smoke detectors, and sprinklers.

Also, you must train your employees on how to evacuate properly when a fire or earthquake strikes. In the event of a hurricane, your employees should know their way around your neighborhood and have sufficient emergency supplies, such as fuel, so that they can vacate fast.

To reduce the risk of theft and other crimes happening in your shop, you can hire security personnel or install high-tech and impenetrable security devices on your premises. Include your website in your security tightening plans, as well.

2. Human Risks

human risk

Human-related risks include employees who have substance use disorder and long-time workers who may abuse your trust and cybercrime. Behavioral problems may be the last thing on your mind when hiring competent employees, but you need to consider them, too. An employee with an alcohol problem will likely deliver a poor performance, potentially affecting your reputation.

Embezzlement and fraud are the risks you may face with a long-time employee who may harbor ill feelings towards you or their colleagues. And in your website or e-commerce shop, security might be breached by a hacker or an insider.

Crime insurance, which should be covered by your business insurance, should compensate you for the monetary or property loss that may result from these incidents.

3. Reputation Risks

Risk mitigation expert Craig Rowe states that many companies, especially small businesses, fail to recognize the possibility of their reputations being damaged. With access to social media available to anybody, a business may crumble in a heartbeat due to a single customer who posted and spread a complaint online.

The best way to reduce reputation risks is to be active in engaging with your audience online. If you received a negative review, immediately offer to improve the dissatisfied customer’s experience. Monitor online content that mentions your brand or product, so you can mend potential issues before they blow up. Train your employees in dealing with difficult customers, as well.

To exercise fairness, ensure that your products and customer service are truly excellent. If you keep on receiving negative feedback, the problem may be on your side. Take a hands-on approach in running your business, and duly investigate all issues you will encounter.

With these three significant risks identified and mitigated in your business plan, you can avoid costly problems that could cause the downfall of your business. To be certain that you have everything covered before officially launching, consult with the right experts.

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